When a Kitty Shirt Causes a Cat Fight | HumorOutcasts

When a Kitty Shirt Causes a Cat Fight

July 16, 2014
By
image

image

 Skinny reality-TV starlet Bethenny Frankel recently posted a photo of herself wearing her 4-year-old daughter’s kitty pajamas. She looked cute. I wiggled into my 7-year-old granddaughter’s t-shirt from the same brand. I looked like a sweating stuffed sausage from a midlife horror movie. The scaredy cat stretched across my ample bosom yelped “Goodbye!” instead of “Hello.”

I almost coughed up a hairball reading about the cat fight that ensured on social media as women howled their outrage at Frankel. The fur started to fly when according to some, the anorexic actress was exploiting her little girl. Others meowed that she was forcing her child to compete with her. This wild cat of an inadequate parent was destroying the self-image of girls and fluffy kittens around the world.

Some allowed their claws to come out and ripped her to shreds on Twitter. They accused the tiny want-to-be actress of eating like a mouse and encouraging bulimia. I suspect that many of these cat-calls came from those with an excessive body mass index, so I stopped reading the comments and moved them to the litter box. Such unwarranted outrage left me scratching the couch. Get a life, already.

For more than thirty years of my adult life, I’ve witnessed the unnecessary vitriol exchanged between women. Before I fade away into the genderless old folk’s home, I’d like to see women celebrate each other instead of fighting like felines in heat. Really, it’s okay if a reality show star wants to wear her kid’s clothes. Those who are foaming at the mouth in disgust need to watch the news to learn from the legitimate reality shows about what really matters. Wars, famine, abuse, stupid politicians – these are all far worse than Bethenny Franklel wearing Hello Kitty slippers.

When I returned the t-shirt to my granddaughter, she asked to wear my old outfits for dress-up clothes. We were delighted as she pranced about in the discarded power dresses of my past life. And, to my knowledge, not one other 7-year-old criticized her for wearing my clothes. Perhaps there is hope for the younger generation.

Elaine Ambrose

Author of ten books including Midlife Cabernet and Menopause Sucks. Blogs on the Huffington Post, BlogHer.com, HumorOutcasts, Midlife Boulevard, ProjectEve, and Erma Bombeck Writers Workshop blog roll. Owns Mill Park Publishing in Idaho and organizes writing retreats. Loves to laugh, preferably while enjoying a bold Cabernet.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook - LinkedIn

Share this Post:

Tags: , ,

9 Responses to When a Kitty Shirt Causes a Cat Fight

  1. July 17, 2014 at 8:05 am

    This was a great post Elaine! I think that women are our own worst enemies when it comes to body image. We need better role models than bethany Frankel. How did she get a TV show anyway?

  2. July 16, 2014 at 1:33 pm

    I appreciate and agree with the comments. I didn’t know who she was, either, and I don’t care. I saw an opportunity to write something humorous because that’s what I do and this is the HumorOutcast site. I would write the subject differently if I wanted to be serious.

    • Kathy Minicozzi
      July 16, 2014 at 5:42 pm

      As someone whose right arm might fit into a four-year-old’s PJs, I applaud you for poking fun of all this. You actually made Bethenny and her bony ass interesting! 😉

      “Hello Kitty” PJs are overrated, anyway. I have a plus-plus sized tee shirt with a picture of my real kitty on it and a funny caption that I wrote. I’d rather wear that.

      • Kathy Minicozzi
        July 16, 2014 at 5:43 pm

        Double posting to say that my kitty has a bit of a “spare tire,” too. It doesn’t slow her down one bit.

  3. July 16, 2014 at 12:38 pm

    I must admit that I am more concerned over abused, neglected, exploited children than I am about some skinny chick in tight pj’s. She just isn’t worth my time . . .

  4. July 16, 2014 at 11:39 am

    Thanks for saying this, Elaine. I don’t have to like or agree with Frankel’s attitudes, but like you, I’m sick to death of women tearing one another apart, especially over our appearance. Each time we do it, we buy into the sexist stereotype that says we simply cannot be kind to one another, and I know that to be untrue.

  5. July 16, 2014 at 11:15 am

    Frankel built her empire on Skinny Girl products, so showing off that she has a waistline of a four year old is not a healthy message to young, impressionable girls. As far as being “ripped to shreds” Frankel can hold her own, otherwise she wouldn’t court controversy.
    But she’s free to do as she pleases, and I’m free to react.
    I do not see women being “unsupportive” of each other when a “role model” (of sorts) sends out a potentially damaging message, and there is criticism.
    That said, I found your column to be very funny.

  6. July 16, 2014 at 10:45 am

    I must be in the dark ages? Who is this woman, anyway?

  7. July 16, 2014 at 10:40 am

    There are bigger fish to fry in the world, I so agree. But there’s also a place for realistic commentary on unhealthy role models and attention seekers like this woman. But I don’t know why we are surprised, one of our biggest “role models” for young women is a reality “star” who built her fame and fortune on a sex tape with the help of her exploitative mother. I’d like to be rich as she is, but it doesn’t invalidate my thoughts about how she got there. I also don’t think that big girls who comment on bulimia should be automatically invalidated. If you have ever known a young girl with an eating disorder you know how horrible it is. People close to this reality star have said her eating disorder played a huge role in the break up of her marriage.



User Login

Help Keep HumorOutcasts Going!

New Release
How to Write and Share Humor
By Donna Cavanagh Published by HumorOutcasts Press

Available in Paperback and Kindle


New Release
Maybe Kevin
By Brian Kiley and HumorOutcasts Press

Available in Paperback and Kindle



New Release
Daddy duJour
By Barbara Hammond and Shorehouse Books

Available in Paperback and Kindle



Archives